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70sscifiart:

"Next to romance and fantasy, I can’t think of any genre other than science fiction that relies so heavily on base images. The possibilities with design are wide open for fiction and arguably non-fiction as well. Mystery and its sub-genres are also able to utilize a larger palette of concepts and mediums, and there are more than a few genre authors out there who signed with publishing houses smart enough to utilize brand and art direction to prove it.

But within the world of sci-fi/fantasy, the art is pretty much stuck with the task of presenting to the reader a fairly non-speculative visual representation of the non-existent world we are about to enter. Paint and ink seem to be the medium of choice to achieve a realistic look that remains firmly rooted in fantasy — its properties, the artist’s hand and even the brush itself reminding us that this is man-made.

I haven’t read a true sci-fi book in awhile, but what’s been making me think of it more and more is the artwork of John Harris. Through coming across the random Orson Scott Card, Ben Bova or John Scalzi books I find when I hunt for books, I have really taken to his covers. His use of scale is unparalleled. One clearly feels there is an epic plot lurking in the pages based on the cover alone, but what initially piqued my interest was his use of abstraction.

Clearly capable of intricate technical detail as seen in his early works, it’s his soft, slightly surreal covers that I find most interesting. The pastel colors and abstract brush strokes grant an entirely new vision of science fiction, one slightly matured and without the need for fanfare. The fragmented images of spaceships and structures with their lack of detail actually allow the bigger picture to become the focus and we immediately feel the vastness of space and how small and minute we are in comparison.

It might be a while before I even have time to contemplate starting a new sci-fi series but if and when I do, it will surely have the art of John Harris on the cover. Everything he’s done artwork for just screams epic which is exactly what I like.”

 (via The Science Fiction Art of John Harris | Colorcubic)

70sscifiart:

"Next to romance and fantasy, I can’t think of any genre other than science fiction that relies so heavily on base images. The possibilities with design are wide open for fiction and arguably non-fiction as well. Mystery and its sub-genres are also able to utilize a larger palette of concepts and mediums, and there are more than a few genre authors out there who signed with publishing houses smart enough to utilize brand and art direction to prove it.

But within the world of sci-fi/fantasy, the art is pretty much stuck with the task of presenting to the reader a fairly non-speculative visual representation of the non-existent world we are about to enter. Paint and ink seem to be the medium of choice to achieve a realistic look that remains firmly rooted in fantasy — its properties, the artist’s hand and even the brush itself reminding us that this is man-made.

I haven’t read a true sci-fi book in awhile, but what’s been making me think of it more and more is the artwork of John Harris. Through coming across the random Orson Scott Card, Ben Bova or John Scalzi books I find when I hunt for books, I have really taken to his covers. His use of scale is unparalleled. One clearly feels there is an epic plot lurking in the pages based on the cover alone, but what initially piqued my interest was his use of abstraction.

Clearly capable of intricate technical detail as seen in his early works, it’s his soft, slightly surreal covers that I find most interesting. The pastel colors and abstract brush strokes grant an entirely new vision of science fiction, one slightly matured and without the need for fanfare. The fragmented images of spaceships and structures with their lack of detail actually allow the bigger picture to become the focus and we immediately feel the vastness of space and how small and minute we are in comparison.

It might be a while before I even have time to contemplate starting a new sci-fi series but if and when I do, it will surely have the art of John Harris on the cover. Everything he’s done artwork for just screams epic which is exactly what I like.”

(via The Science Fiction Art of John Harris | Colorcubic)

(via sendword)

Photo
mpdrolet:

Danila Tkachenko
Photo

(Source: viciouslycyd, via thelucidfox)

Video

bothkindsofmusic:

Merle Haggard - Are The Good Times Really Over

He makes some funny half way through. 

Photo
roachpatrol:

archiemcphee:

Forget Google Glass, Android Wear, Smartwatches or contact lenses that give you night vision. Instead let’s talk about the awesomeness that is this 17th century Chinese abacus ring. It’s wearable tech from the Qing Dynasty, perhaps the world’s oldest smart ring.
Measuring a mere 1.2 centimeter-long by 0.7 centimeter-wide, the miniature abacus is a fully functional counting tool, but it’s so tiny that using it requires an equally dainty tool, such as a pin, to manipulate the beads, which are each less than one millimeter long.

"However, this is no problem for this abacus’s primary user—the ancient Chinese lady, for she only needs to pick one from her many hairpins."

[via Fashionably Geek and Gizmodo]

oh my god ancient chinese ladies knew where it was at

roachpatrol:

archiemcphee:

Forget Google Glass, Android Wear, Smartwatches or contact lenses that give you night vision. Instead let’s talk about the awesomeness that is this 17th century Chinese abacus ring. It’s wearable tech from the Qing Dynasty, perhaps the world’s oldest smart ring.

Measuring a mere 1.2 centimeter-long by 0.7 centimeter-wide, the miniature abacus is a fully functional counting tool, but it’s so tiny that using it requires an equally dainty tool, such as a pin, to manipulate the beads, which are each less than one millimeter long.

"However, this is no problem for this abacus’s primary user—the ancient Chinese lady, for she only needs to pick one from her many hairpins."

[via Fashionably Geek and Gizmodo]

oh my god ancient chinese ladies knew where it was at

(via bikinganddancingandsinging)

Audio

The Replacements - Unsatisfied
(Let It Be, 1984)

Photo
behindbobsburgers:

"I Get Psych-Cic Out of You" Tarot Card V - "The Hierophant"
Watch the episode tonight at 7pm on FOX!
Big thanks to Anthony Aguinaldo, Hector Reynoso and Paige Garrison for making these.

behindbobsburgers:

"I Get Psych-Cic Out of You" Tarot Card V - "The Hierophant"

Watch the episode tonight at 7pm on FOX!

Big thanks to Anthony Aguinaldo, Hector Reynoso and Paige Garrison for making these.

Photo
Photoset
Photo
Photoset
Photoset

(Source: subtubitles, via mvti)

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Plantation Park Drive

Plantation Park Drive

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photographersdirectory:



Jan Herdlicka, photographer from Berlin
I am a young photographer born in Munich and currently based in Berlin, Germany.
While studying cultural sciences i started to develop my own visual language.
After i began using digital cameras i now ended up doing most of my photography with black and white self-developped film material. I would consider my work to be influenced by the photographers i admire like Meyerowitz, Gilden, Moriyama or Ansel Adams. Nevertheless i would not say that i take photographs having somekind of premade plan or system in my mind. Most things just happen. First i try to let my feelings and intuition lead me the way to find motives. After developping the films and scanning the negatives i try to structurize the results and create series that, again show me the way to new ideas and so on and on……..just following my instincts and trying to keep the process in flow.
Besides that i started doing my own miniprint trading-cards called SAMMELKARTEN last year and released them frequently on several blogs such as findingberlin.com (i will attach an image of them:)).
Feel free to checkout my work at:
www.janherdlicka.com
https://www.facebook.com/JanHerdlicka
www.janherdlicka.tumblr.com

photographersdirectory:

Jan Herdlicka, photographer from Berlin

I am a young photographer born in Munich and currently based in Berlin, Germany.

While studying cultural sciences i started to develop my own visual language.

After i began using digital cameras i now ended up doing most of my photography with black and white self-developped film material. I would consider my work to be influenced by the photographers i admire like Meyerowitz, Gilden, Moriyama or Ansel Adams. Nevertheless i would not say that i take photographs having somekind of premade plan or system in my mind. Most things just happen. First i try to let my feelings and intuition lead me the way to find motives. After developping the films and scanning the negatives i try to structurize the results and create series that, again show me the way to new ideas and so on and on……..just following my instincts and trying to keep the process in flow.

Besides that i started doing my own miniprint trading-cards called SAMMELKARTEN last year and released them frequently on several blogs such as findingberlin.com (i will attach an image of them:)).

Feel free to checkout my work at:

www.janherdlicka.com

https://www.facebook.com/JanHerdlicka

www.janherdlicka.tumblr.com

(via matt-0)

Photo

(Source: coreycarlisle)